Musings, OOTD, Life

Warrior > Worrier

Katie Ladrido| Miyagi Japanese Restaurant | McLean, Virginia | September 2014

Katie Ladrido| Miyagi Japanese Restaurant | McLean, Virginia | September 2014

This weekend, I meditated on a core value in my life. I know in my heart that overthinking is a dangerous emotional and intellectual cancer, yet life's impetuous nature often sucks us into this need to control and perfect what we can. Although my dad is one of the most successful businessmen and flawless human beings I know, one of the most valuable lessons I've learned from him is that perfection, at the expense of experience, is annihilation. Overthinking paralyzes us from living from our soul. Cut the bullshxt.

"Fxck it." My final thought before making most decisions.  

"Fxck it." My final thought before making most decisions.  

We must, instead, choose to enjoy our ability to live in the present in a way that others only dare to dream. Be able to live in the moment, and then let go. Don't get caught up with worrying about what will happen next or trying so hard to keep memories alive that we prohibit ourselves from fully experiencing it. Allow the moment to consume you. The fact is that all moments come and go. Some are beautiful and others are horrible, but everything eventually makes sense. Our life is but one quick fleeting moment that we are blessed to live out in slow motion. In the end, all we are left with is memories; the shadows of those magnificent moments that give our lives meaning.

Everything is lost sooner or later, and you can either accept this as fact or some jaded blogger's misguided notion about her existence. But perhaps instead of focusing on what is or what could go wrong, think genuinely about what it is you want to do instead of the politics of your situation. Instead of always constantly trying to overthink everything that happens and every card life deals us with, hanging onto every tiny detail, and pressuring ourselves to weather each and every storm, would it not be better to allow life itself and all the circumstances surrounding it to dictate its longevity? Would we not be better off spending our focus on what we are currently experiencing rather than contemplating whether it will turn into something grander or whether it will fizzle and fade?
 
All the ties we form with people and all our endeavors have a finite start and end date. It may only last for a few months or years, or it could last until your dying breath, but the reality is, it will end. The only options you have are to either spend that finite time contemplating and rationalizing your experience or you could spend that time living it. I urge you to choose the latter; in my experience, it has always been the better path. Don't miss out on fighting for your moments because you're too busy balancing out your fears and measuring your actions. Be a warrior, not a worrier.